Subic Bay is a bay on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometres (62 mi) northwest of Manila Bay. It is an extension of the South China Sea, and its shores were formerly the site of a major United States Navy facility named U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, it is now the location of an industrial and commercial area known as the Subic Bay Freeport Zone under the Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority.

The bay was long recognized for its deep and protected waters, but development was slow due to lack of level terrain around the bay.

Pamulaklakin Nature Park

The Pamulaklakin Nature Park is a reserve area of Binictican. Part of the 11 thousand hectares of forest is found at Subic Bay. The park was created by the Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority to supplement the income of the indigenous people. The term Pamulaklakin was derived from the native Ambala language, which means a herbal vine.

Shipwrecks of Subic Bay

The majority of the wrecks in Subic Bay are a result of either the Spanish–American War in 1898 or of World War II, where a number of Japanese vessels were sunk by American aircraft.

El Capitan was a freighter of nearly 3,000 tons just under 130 meters long. She sank in Subic Bay where she rests on a sloping bottom.
Hell ship Oryoku Maru: On 15 December 1944, she had 1,619 American, British  and Czech prisoners of war on board when she was sunk, under heavy bombardment by American fighters while on her way from Subic Bay to Japan. She was less than half a kilometer off the Alava Pier when attacked. About 300 prisoners died during the short voyage from Manila and during the attack.

Seian Maru: During an air raid on Subic Bay, the 3,712 ton freighter Seian Maru was bombed and sunk. This was only four days after the sinking of the Oryoku Maru on 19 December 1944.

LST (Landing Ship, Tank) This is one of the large LSTs that litter the floor of Subic Bay. She was scuttled in 1946 in the middle of Subic Bay between the southern tip of the runway and Grande Island.

The old USS New York (ACR-2), which had been renamed the USS Rochester (CA-2) in 1917. At the onset of the Japanese invasion of the Philippines, this ship was acting as a floating workshop and storehouse. Already decommissioned, the armored hull of the old cruiser was too valuable to allowed to be captured, and so she was scuttled in December 1941 by American forces.

San Quentin: During the Spanish–American war in 1898, the Spanish scuttled their San Quintín (now often referred to as the San Quentin) in the hope of blocking the passage between Grande Island and Chiquita Islands near the mouth of Subic Bay.

More Information on Subic Bay Travel

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