Bohol

By: | September 4th, 2014 | 0 Comment

Bohol is the main island of Bohol Province which has 75 minor surrounding islands. The island lies southeast from Cebu Island and southwest of Leyte Island in the Central Visayas region. This oval-shaped island is the tenth largest island of the Philippine archipelago. Another gem of the Visayas, Bohol is a tropical haven of natural beauty. The coastline of the island is skimmed by gentle coves and white sand beaches. Bohol is not as internationally famous as nearby Boracay, but is well-known locally as a paradise for divers and snorkelers. Dolphin watching and whale watching tours are popular with both residents and visiting tourists. The best season is from March to June, but dolphins can be seen year-round. In addition to white sand beaches and dive spots, Bohol is famous among others, for its Chocolate Hills, the Tarsier – arguably the world’s smallest primate, heritage sites and old stone


Going to Bohol

By plane

Philippine Airlines (PAL), Cebu Pacific and Zest Air all service the Tagbilaran Airport. As of December 2012, PAL flies 4 direct flights daily from Manila each way. Currently all flights are during the day, however there are plans to upgrade the Tagbilaran airport to accommodate night flights. The Tagbilaran airport has had recent renovations. The tarmac accomodates 2 planes at time. PAL typically uses an Airbus 319 for service to Bohol.

By boat

The Tagbilaran City Tourist Pier handles more than 4,000 travelers on a daily basis. Nine daily ship calls from Cebu are processed efficiently, with other ships from Manila, Cagayan de Oro City, Dumaguete, Dipolog, Iligan City, Larena, Plaridel and Ozamiz City also welcomed on a regular basis. Another four port terminals cater specifically to Cebu and northern Mindanao routes. Additional berthing space for fastcraft ferries is currently under construction.

One way from Cebu is P500 by ocean jet and P800 for the round trip. (April 2014)

What to see in Bohol

Tarsier

For the past 45 million years, tarsiers have inhabited rainforests around the world, but now they only exist on a few islands in the Philippines, Borneo and Indonesia. In Bohol, the Philippine Tarsier was a common sight in the southern part of the island until the 1960’s. Once protected by the humid rainforests and mist-shrouded hills, these mysterious primates struggle to survive as their home is cleared for crop growing and poaching.

To date, the Philippine Tarsier Foundation has acquired 7.4 hectares of land in Corella, Bohol for a Tarsier sanctuary. With the Department of Environment and Natural Resources playing an oversight role, the foundation has asked other Bohol towns with Philippines Tarsier populations to donate 20 hectares (49.4 acres) of forestland for conservation.

It also runs a Tarsier Research and Development Center, which serves as a visitor center and venue for research, as well as a habitat preserve. At the sanctuary, a spacious net enclosure keeps a number of Philippine Tarsiers for feeding, captive breeding and display. Here, visitors can observe the Philippine Tarsier in their natural habitat. Within the sanctuary, the Philippine Tarsiers roam freely and all of them have got used to a seven-foot high fence that circumscribes the territory and which serves mainly to protect them from predators like feral cats while maintaining a theoretical chance for tarsiers to leave the enclosure and return as their wish.

Do not visit the caged Tarsiers which are elsewhere on the island (especially in Loboc). These are kept in insufficient conditions and often die of stress from the visitors and poor care. Dead animals are frequently replaced by new one illegally captured from the while creating a high stress on the yet surviving population.

The Tarsier was used by Stephen Spielberg as the inspiration for E.T.

The Chocolate Hills

The Chocolate Hills are probably Bohol’s most famous tourist attraction. The hills, which look like giant mole hill, are considered unusual geological formation that consists of at least 1,268 individual mounds that are scattered throughout the municipalities of Carmen, Batuan, and Sagbayan. The hills range from 30 to 50 meters high and are covered in green grass, which turns to brown during the dry season, making them look like chocolate mounds. ( Quoted from “Your Guide to Bohol” by Sanchez-Bronce, Loop and Carpentier)

Legend has it that the hills came into existence when two giants threw stones and sand at each other in a fight that lasted for days. When they were finally exhausted, they made friends and left the island, but left behind the mess they made. For the more romantically inclined is the tale of Arogo, a young and very strong giant who fell in love with an ordinary mortal girl called Aloya. After she died, the giant Arogo cried bitterly. His tears then turned into hills, as a lasting proof of his grief.

However, up to this day, even geologists have not reached consensus on how they where formed. The most commonly accept theory is that they are the weathered formations of a kind of marine limestone on top of a impermeable layer of clay.

About Marianne Castro

Bohol
As a social media manager i am focused on managing the content and design for all of the companies’ social media platforms. Responsibilities include ensuring that all content is creatively and strategically written, within brand and design guidelines.

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